by Father Ron Rolheiser
A generation ago, Karl Rahner made the statement that there would soon come a time when
each of us will either be a mystic or a non-believer.

Ron Rolheiser
What’s implied here? At one level it means that anyone who wants to have faith today will
need to be much more inner-directed than in previous generations. Why? Because
up until our present generation, in the secularised world, by and large, the culture helped carry the faith. We lived in cultures (often immigrant and ethnic subcultures) within which
faith and religion were part of the very fabric of life. Faith and Church were embedded in the sociology. It took a strong, deviant action not to go to church on Sunday.
Today, as we know, the opposite is more true. It takes a strong, inner-anchored act to go to church on Sunday.
We live in a moral and ecclesial diaspora and experience a special loneliness that comes with that. We have few outside supports for our faith.
The culture no longer carries the faith and the Church. Simply put, we knew how to be believers and churchgoers when we were inside communities that helped carry that
for us, communities within which almost everyone seemed to believe, almost everyone went to church, and almost everyone had the same set of moral values. Not incidentally, those
communities were often immigrant, poor, undereducated, and culturally marginalised. In that type of setting, faith and Church work more easily.
Why? Because, among other reasons, as Jesus said, it is hard for the rich to enter the kingdom of heaven.
To be committed believers today, to have faith truly inform our lives, requires finding an inner anchor beyond the support and security we find in being part of the cognitive
majority wherein we have the comfort of knowing that, since everyone else is doing this, it
probably makes sense.
Many of us now live in situations where to believe in God and church is to find ourselves without the support of the majority, and at times without the support even of those closest to us — spouse, family, friends, colleagues.
That’s one of the things that Rahner is referring to when he says we will be either mystics or non-believers.
But what is this deep, inner anchor that is needed to sustain us? What can give us the support we need?
What can help sustain our faith when we feel like unanimity-minus one is an inner centre of strength, meaning, and affectivity that is rooted in something beyond what the world
thinks and what the majority are doing on any given day? There has to be a deeper source than outside affirmation to give us meaning, justification and energy to continue to do what
faith asks of us. What is that source?
In the Gospel of John, the first words out of Jesus’ mouth are a question: “What are you looking for?”
Essentially, everything Jesus does and teaches in the rest of John’s Gospel gives an answer to that question: We are looking for the way, the truth, the life, living water to quench our thirst, bread from heaven to satiate our hunger. But those answers are partially abstract. At the end of the Gospel, all of this is crystallised into one image: On Easter Sunday morning,
Mary Magdala goes out searching for Jesus. She finds him in a garden (the archetypal place
where lovers meet), but she doesn’t recognise him. Jesus turns to her and, repeating the question with which the Gospel began, asks her: “What are you looking for?”
Mary replies that she is looking for the body of the dead Jesus, and could he give her any information as to where that body is. And Jesus simply says: “Mary.” He pronounces her name
in love. She falls at his feet.
In essence, that is the whole Gospel: What are we ultimately looking for? What is the end of all desire? What drives us out into gardens to search for love? The desire to hear God pronounce our names in love. To hear God, lovingly say “Mary”, “Jack”, “Jennifer”, “Walter”.
Several years ago, I made a retreat that began with the director telling us: “I’m only going to try to do one thing with you this week. I’m going to try to teach you how to pray so
that sometime (perhaps not this week or perhaps not even this year, but sometime) in prayer, you will open yourself up in such a way that you can hear God say to you — I love you!
Because unless that happens you will always be dissatisfied and searching for something to give you a completeness you don’t feel. Nothing will ever be quite right. But once you hear God say those words, you won’t need to do that restless search anymore.”
He’s right. Hearing God pronounce our names in love is the core of mysticism and it is also the anchor we need when we face misunderstanding from without and depression from within,
when we feel precisely like unanimityminus one.
Oblate Father Ron Rolheiser, theologian, teacher, and award-winning author, is president of the Oblate School of Theology in San Antonio, Texas. He can be contacted through his website www.ronrolheiser.com
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